5 organization hacks for busy parents

Like many of you, I wear many of hats throughout a day. Between being a mom, running a full-time business and managing my team, plus keeping my house and personal well-being in check it feels like there never is enough time. We are always searching for time to add to our day. Clients always tell me that if they had more time they could do XYZ and I get it. I know that I can’t change how many hours are in a day but I can change what I do in the environment where I spend my days. There are things that I can do throughout the day and week that can get me—and you, too—more in control and grounded so that when I lay my head down at night I’m not running through the laundry list of items still on my to-do list.

And while I can’t dish out tips for how to master the work/parenting balance (is there even such a thing?!), I can tell you that there are things that can be done in your home to help save you time and sanity, which is a pretty big “win” if you ask me!

Rachel Rosenthal - Pantry - www.rachelrosenthal.co

Organizing Hacks for Busy Parents

  1. Keep extra essentials in the downstairs bathroom. In our house we keep toothbrushes and hair supplies in a bin underneath the downstairs bathroom sink. That way as we're heading to the door to grab backpacks and put their shoes on they can stop in the bathroom for final preparations instead of taking longer than necessary to run upstairs.

  2. Dedicate space for each person in each shared area. In the entryway, add hooks for each person to hang and access their belongings. Kids are expected to do this at school at an early age so transitioning the behavior to the home should be doable, especially if the hooks are within their reach.

  3. Incorporate a permanent donation bin. A bin, bag, or basket in your kid’s closet will come in hand more often than you realize. It can feel that kids outgrow clothing, shoes, and interest in toys and games just as quickly as they come in to your home. Designate a donation spot in each of your kids' closets for outgrown clothes and in your garage or storage room for toys that your children no longer play with). When the bags and bins are full that's your cue to get the donation items out and clear room for the next cycle of stuff.

  4. Paper and library book drop zones. Kids bring home so many papers on a daily basis, so giving them a spot to unload their folders and backpacks is a great way to easily create a stack that should be reviewed and dealt with accordingly. For homework and any paperwork that needs to be returned to school, simply add it back to the basket to indicate that it should be loaded back into the folder/backpack. This is a great option for giving library books a place to land so that your kids have a visual reminder to return them rather than them making their way to your home’s bookshelves.

  5. Make your fridge and pantry kid-friendly. Store snacks and lunch-supplies on low shelves and in labeled containers that are easy for the kids to identify and grab on their own. This way, you empower them to get their own snacks and food and you are creating more independent children. You also save time putting things back and away when you get home from the grocery store because everything has a place and you can find what you need, when you need it.

I’d love to know: Are there systems in place in your home that you’d add to the list? If so, let me know in the comments section!